CULINARY TREASURES FROM AROUND THE WORLD

Afghanistan
Why this recipe?
« Kabuli Palau (also known as Qabili Palau) is Afghanistan’s national dish. Traditionally, an Afghan woman’s marriage prospects hinge on her ability to prepare good Palau; many women put a lot of effort into perfecting this dish. »
Australia
Why this recipe?
« ANZAC is an acronym for Australia and New Zealand Army Corps. Any food Australians at home sent to those serving abroad during World War I had to be carried in the ships of the Merchant Navy. Most of these ships had no refrigeration facilities, so any food sent had to remain edible after periods in excess of two months. »
Austria
Why this recipe?
« Kaiserschmarrn is one of Austria’s most famous and popular traditional desserts. Since it’s so fast and easy to make, recipes are passed on from generation to generation, with many families adding their own twist like adding almonds, cherries or sour cream. »
Bahamas
Why this recipe?
« This well-loved Bahamian dessert is used for special occasions like Easter Sunday, Mother’s Day and Christmas. The Bahamian recipe of Guava Duff combines the guava fruit, a sweet dough and a special rum or brandy sauce drizzled on top. The recipe uses this unique cooking method of steaming the dough. »
Belgium
Why this recipe?
« The preparation of the “Flemish Rabbit” commonly called “Rabbit with Prunes and Beer” goes back to the Middle Ages, when sweet and sour combinations were very appreciated. Today, this festive dish is undoubtedly part of the Belgian culinary heritage. »
Chile
Why this recipe?
« The recipe for the Adela cake goes back to my ancestors, who came to Chile from Italy 185 years ago. It was transferred from generation to generation but it was my mother, Adela, who finished perfecting it. Nowadays, the women in my family, my sisters and nieces, prepare it for every special celebration. It has become a family symbol. »
Denmark
Why this recipe?
« Risalamande is a traditional, delicious and creamy Danish dessert served in most families’ homes on Christmas Eve. It was created in Denmark in the later part of the 19th century. The name comes from the French ‘riz à l’amande’ meaning ‘rice with almonds‘. Traditionally, one whole almond is hidden in the dessert and guests compete to find it. »
Ecuador
Why this recipe?
« The Fanesca is a traditional Ecuadorian dish made in memory of the biblical story of the Last Supper. The dozen grains in the recipe represent the twelve apostles. The cod, on the other hand, represents Jesus. The Ecuadorian tradition is to gather with family and friends on Good Friday to eat a Fanesca. Nowadays, Fanesca is consumed throughout Lent »
Egypt
Why this recipe?
« Fattah is very popular in the Middle East, but it differs from one country to another. It is very common in the Egyptian kitchen, particularly during the Eidul-Adha Festival. It is also served as a main dish at the celebration of the birth of babies, a ceremony called an ‘Aqeeqa’. »
Georgia
Why this recipe?
« Although most people in Georgia would not understand why someone would not eat pork for ethical reasons, religious people, on the other hand, eat an essentially plant-based diet during periods of fasting. This recipe comes from this tradition. »
Germany
Why this recipe?
« In different parts of the world, German cheesecake is known by other names. The Austrians call it Topfenkuchen and the Swiss know it as Quarktorte and Quarkkuchen. Lovers of German cheesecake enjoy it for its lighter texture and a taste that is less sweet than other varieties, but still full of flavour. »
Greece
Why this recipe?
« Perfect with end-of-season tomatoes, this super healthy treat is best enjoyed with a dry white Greek wine from Santorini Island such as Assyrtiko, or a sweet Moschato from Peloponnese.” »
India
Why this recipe?
« In older days, people would cook the mince-filled triangles over campfires and eat them as snacks during travel. Nevertheless, from its humble beginnings, samosa has come a long way. And after having earned the blessings of the Indian royalty, the snack soon became food fit for the king. »
Indonesia
Why this recipe?
« This dish is served for festive occasions, especially on the IdulFitri Day (Eid Mubarak). The origin of Opor Ayam is from Central Java. There are many recipes for Opor Ayam, and this is a mild version of it. »
Israel
Why this recipe?
« Hamin is an Israeli slow-cooking stew, originally a Jewish dish, which became popular due to the desire to eat a hot meal on the Sabbath. Due to the restrictions on cooking, preparing a meal in advance and cooking it overnight was a perfect solution. »
Jamaica
Why this recipe?
« Ackee is a very delicious fruit when prepared with seasoning and salt fish and is considered one of Jamaica’s greatest delicacies. Although the ackee is not indigenous to Jamaica, it is part of the country’s remarkable history, having been imported from West Africa, most likely on a slave ship.. »
Kuwait
Why this recipe?
« The ‘Zubaidi fish recipe’ has been an integral part of Gulf history and the Kuwaiti cuisine for a long time. It produces very tender meat and tastes great. Although it is an expensive variety of fish, it is very popular. This very tasty fish is often served in homes in Kuwait. »
Lebanon
Why this recipe?
« This recipe finds its echo in the mountains of Syria and Lebanon. In the Middle Ages, tabbouleh was a common dish of people’s diets. Today, it is one of the most popular salads in the Middle East. In the mid-19th century, Bekaa Valley, in Lebanon, was considered to be a favourable location for producing bulgur. »
Mexico
Why this recipe?
« In order to honour Don Agustín de Iturbide, who became emperor shortly after independence, the nuns decided that the dish should bear these same three colours. As such, chiles en nogada features the green poblano pepper, the white walnut sauce and the red pomegranate seeds as a garnish. »
Moldova
Why this recipe?
« Moldova’s fertile soil favours the growth of delicious fruits, nuts and vegetables which bring unique flavour to its cuisine. As Greek and Turkish traditions had strong influences on the Moldovan cuisine, it is hard to tell where the recipe comes from, but there is no festive table in Moldova without this dessert! »
Morocco
Why this recipe?
« “The word ‘pastilla’ is a Spanish word derived from the term ‘pasta’ (pastry or dough). The recipe was brought to Morocco by Moorish refugees in 1492, where it is also known as ‘bastela’, one of the most appreciated and outstanding dishes of Moroccan cuisine. There are several variations: salty, sweet, and sweet and salty. »
Nepal
Why this recipe?
« Masala relationship with chai began between 5,000 to 9,000 years ago in an ancient royal court in India or Thailand. From very early on, Masala’s version of chai has been prepared with a wide range of spices, served hot or cold as a remedy for mild ailments, but traditionally it did not contain any tea leaves or caffeine. »
New Zealand
Why this recipe?
« The Afghan biscuit is a favourite of New Zealanders. Its origin is not known, however, according to one amusing legend, a young Afghan man passing through New-Zealand made such an impression that the biscuit was created in his honour. »
Norway
Why this recipe?
« May 17th has been Norway’s Constitution day since 1814. On this day, on any table in Norway, you can always find a bløtkake. It is a layer cake made of delicious berries and cream between layers of vanilla sponge. There are two main types of these infamous layer cakes: cream and marzipan cake. »
Pakistan
Why this recipe?
« Burfi is a traditional sweet delicacy consumed by people all over the Indian subcontinent. The name is Persian and means snow or ice due to its milky white colour. Made of condensed milk and sugar, it is usually cut into cubes or diamond shapes. »
South Korea
Why this recipe?
« I love my mom’s Kimchi. We make it together with my older sister and my aunt every year at the end of November. I have many sweet memories about ‘gimjang’. »
Spain
Why this recipe?
« This is a typical family Christmas recipe. A few days before the Holidays began, the women would gather to prepare the hens. It was the preamble to Christmas, when the house had the warmth and smells of the Holidays. »
Sweden
Why this recipe?
« Fika is Swedish for a coffee break that’s more about socializing than drinking coffee. Something sweet is always welcome and cinnamon buns are a classic at Swedish Fika. The cinnamon bun has a day dedicated to it in the Swedish calendar, the 4th of October. This does not stop Swedes from eating them regularly throughout the year. »
Switzerland
Why this recipe?
« Fondue originated in 18th century Switzerland as a way for farm families to stretch out their food supplies during the long winter months. With some leftover cheese, stale bread and a splash of wine, a family could gather around the fireplace for a warm and filling meal. »
Tunisia
Why this recipe?
« Couscous is of Berber origin. Culinary historian, Lucie Bolens, describes primitive pots of couscous found in tombs dating back to the reign of the Berber king Massinissa (between 238 and 149 BC). This area of Northern Africa was particularly prosperous and considered the granary of Rome. Today, no great celebration is organized without couscous. »

OTHER COUNTRIES

Algeria, Angola, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Benin, Bolivia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Brazil, Bulgaria, Burkina Faso, China, Colombia, Costa Rica, Croatia, Democratic Republic Of the Congo, El Salvador, England, Estonia, Ethiopia, Finland, France, Guatemala, Haiti, Hungary, Iceland, Italy, Ivory Coast, Japan, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kosovo, Libya, Lithuania, Macedonia, Malaysia, Mali, Myanmar, Panama, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Qatar, Romania, Russia, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Senegal, Serbia, Slovakia, Slovenia, Sri Lanka, Syria, Thailand, The Netherlands, Togo, Trinidad and Tobago, Turkey, Uruguay, Venezuela

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